A Top Mountain Runner Born With Birth Defects

Posted: January 22, 2008 in marathon running

Yesterday I wrote a post about Mt. Everest marathon, the world highest marathon. Running at temperatures dropping to negative 20 degrees centrigade is no joke. I was interested to know about runners who thrive on running in this extreme conditions and I found a story of Angela Mudge a story of guts and courage.

The times newspaper of UK ran a story on Angela Mudge claiming “Angela Mudge is the queen of racing at altitude  a sport that is so demanding that few can even begin to  imagine what is involved.”

Mudge from Scotland who is 37 broke the Everest marathon by 13 minutes. The previous long standing record was held by Ann Stentifold, a Briton. Talk of British supremacy! A Nolstagia to a bygone era when the Union Jack ruled the world.

Lucky to make it to the starting line

To understand how tough the Everest marathon is, the article says “During the long trek to the start , near Everest base camp, about 80% of runners suffered diarhoea, altitude sickness, deep vein thrombosis, reduced lung capacity and chest infections.” That was even before the marathon proper begun!

Overcoming the birth defect

 This is a woman who at birth doctors thought she had little chance if any at all to be a runner. On her biography on wikipedia she was born with defects in here legs, in the first few years of her life she had to use braces and plaster to rectify the defect. Its amazing she is now mountain running.

Her Secret Diet

She believes in tradition , instead of consuming expensive sports supplements, health drinks, energy bars and caffeinegels which she regards as a waste of mone, Mudge swears by Jelly babies, bountys bars, diluted juice and good old WATER!

Just like us, she does what she does for the love of running.

Her New Year ambition? Ultrarunning; running up to 100 miles. Go Girl.

 

Advertisements
Comments
  1. […] Constantine njeru wrote an interesting post today on A Top Mountain Runner Born With Birth DefectsHere’s a quick excerptTo understand how tough the Everest marathon is, the article says “During the long trek to the start , near Everest base camp, about 80% of runners suffered diarhoea, altitude sickness, deep vein thrombosis, reduced lung capacity and … […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s